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More Train Insanity

March 4, 2010 at 11:48 am Matt Leave a comment Go to comments

From Reason TV:

But but but for Strickland’s inner-state 3-C, none of this anti-train talk is legitimate. Didn’t you know that young people dig the GREEEEEEEEN dude?

Ohio’s transportation chief pushed back yesterday against critics of the state’s plan to link major cities by passenger trains, saying the service would prove useful to thousands of Ohioans and help attract young professionals to major cities.

Ohio Department of Transportation Director Jolene Molitoris said she and her staff are preparing answers to 22 questions raised by state Senate President Bill M. Harris about the proposed service connecting Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton and Cincinnati.[...]

Molitoris said the rails would be useful to thousands of college students, business travelers and families who want to spend a day or more in one of the cities along the route. She also said it would stimulate economic development in the four major cities and beyond.

“It will help attract and keep young professionals who value green transportation,” Molitoris said.

Nice to hear such happy talk from Molitoris, a graduate of Catholic University and Case Western Reserve University where she studied speech and drama… skills she will sorely need to sell this God-awful plan.

Even if they were correct in calling the project “green” (which it isn’t), who cares if the train is empty? It’s greener just to have no train.

If you missed Terry Casey’s and Scott Pullins’s train debate yesterday, you can find it here.

Related posts:

  1. Ted Strickland’s “C3″ Slow-Train Gets Shorter
  2. Ted Strickland on his Slow-Train: Young Adults Embrace 19th Century Change
  3. Matt Mayer on Ted Strickland’s 3C Slow Train
  4. Buckeye Institute Report: Don’t Build The Obama/Strickland Slow Train
  5. Republicans Terry Casey and Scott Pullins Debate Strickland’s 3C Slow Train

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