Home > John Kasich Signs Taxpayer Protection Plan

John Kasich Signs Taxpayer Protection Plan

June 4, 2010 at 2:50 pm Matt Leave a comment Go to comments

As you can see in this old YouTube web ad I made in 2006, Gov. Ted Strickland made it clear that he had no interest in signing a “no new taxes” pledge. And after a 4.2% state income tax hike that you had to pay at the end of 2009 AFTER your deductions were probably already taken out of your pay, billions of dollars in fee increases, endless spending mandates tied to one-time Federal stimulus dollars, we now know why.

But it looks like John Kasich, much like Governor Christie in New Jersey, is promising to be an adult and clean up after the big-government liberal children in Columbus. To make this sort of promise in the face of at least an $8 billion dollar deficit is a BIG deal, and it starts to paint the picture of the dramatic choices between a pro-growth Kasich and a status quo Strickland:

Former U.S. House Budget Committee Chair John Kasich, a Republican running for Governor of Ohio, has signed the Taxpayer Protection Pledge sponsored by Americans for Tax Reform (ATR). The Pledge is a commitment to the taxpayers of Ohio to “oppose and veto any and all efforts to increase taxes.”

To date, 13 incumbent Ohio state legislators have signed the Pledge. Additionally, every Republican member of Ohio’s U.S. House delegation has taken the Pledge. Nationally, nine governors and over 1,100 state legislators nationwide have signed.

“Ohio residents need leaders committed to pulling Ohio out of the economic rut created by a perpetual tax-and-spend culture in Columbus. John Kasich was a true leader in Congress when he wrote the first balanced budget in decades. I commend him for reaffirming his commitment to the taxpayers of Ohio as a candidate for Governor,” said Grover Norquist, president of ATR.

“Ohio’s unemployment has doubled under Ted Strickland as its economy has stagnated, and it’s not difficult to figure out why. His answer to Ohio’s overspending problem was a crippling $844 million tax increase. John Kasich offers a fresh alternative for Ohioans struggling to survive in the Strickland economy.”

“I applaud John for his leadership and dedication to the ideals of limited government, as well as for putting the interest of the people ahead of the government’s desire for endless spending,” added Norquist. “I strongly encourage every candidate in Ohio and in elected offices throughout the country to sign the Taxpayer Protection Pledge.”

Related posts:

  1. State Rep. John Adams, Navy Seal, Ass Kicker, Chairs Ohio Taxpayer Protection Caucus
  2. Dave Yost Signs ATR’s Anti-Tax Pledge
  3. AG Rich Cordray Signs on to Letter U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Agency
  4. State Rep. Dann Dodd ONLY Elected Official to Violate Tax Pledge
  5. It is Official: Ted Strickland is a Tax Hiker… John Kasich is Ready to Make Him Wear that Label

  1. modernesquire
    June 7th, 2010 at 06:42 | #1

    Governor Strickland CUT income taxes 17%, expanded the homestead exemption, and passed a cut to the tangible property tax just last week.

    Truth hurts, doesn't it, Naugle?

  2. Joshua Culling
    June 8th, 2010 at 08:10 | #2

    Strickland cut income taxes?

    hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

  3. modernesquire
    June 8th, 2010 at 12:08 | #3

    HAHAHAHAHA…. find anything that says I'm wrong.

    Personal income taxes are 17% lower than when Governor Strickland came into office. That's a fact. The personal tangible property tax cut I mentioned passed last week. His first budget expanded the homestead property tax exemption.

    Ted Strickland cut taxes after Ohio GOP's Governors raised them.

    Truth hurts, don't it?

  4. Jake
    June 8th, 2010 at 14:34 | #4

    Mr. Esquire…except Strickland never CUT the income taxes, income taxes are LOWER because of the Bill passed in 2005, which lowered taxes incrementally.

    How can you give benefit to taxes being LOWER than when he came into office, when the METHOD that lowered them was passed BEFORE he was governor.

    Strickland's only foray into Income Tax was when he SUSPENDED the last cut…

  5. JLocker1243
    June 8th, 2010 at 14:37 | #5

    so you ask me to find where you are wrong, you are wrong when you stated that Strickland CUT taxes 17%, when the cut occurred in 2005.

  6. modernesquire
    June 8th, 2010 at 15:14 | #6

    Except as you pointed out, Strickland had the option of not including them in his budgets.

    Governor Strickland had the option to oppose the tax reforms, he embraced them. And the issue was that taxes are lower as a result.

    The General Assembly cannot constitutionally create law beyond their term, not without the willingness and acceptance of that future General Assembly and Governor to so bind themselves.

    Furthermore, you seem to gloss over the other taxes Strickland cut as Governor as well.

  7. June 8th, 2010 at 15:24 | #7

    the homestead exemption was funded through the tobacco settlement from Republican Attorney General Betty Montgomery.

    Want to talk taxes? Are fees taxes? Are future spending mandates tied to 1-time stimulus dollars taxes, or how about the general irresponsibility of using excessive federal dollars in the first place? What about the unemployment fund which OH took a federal loan out for and can never pay back?

    At the end of 2009, after everyone had taxes taken out of their paychecks, the percent was adjusted- a retroactive tax cut, which is more painful because it wasn't foreseen.

    However, through his comments, Modern Esquire is admitting Ohio is a center right state, and campaigns are won in the language of fiscal conservatism and tax cuts. nicely done, former Strickland staffer.

  8. Jake
    June 8th, 2010 at 16:16 | #8

    come on… not raising taxes is not equal to cutting taxes. thats a really really big faulty assumption there Esquire.

  9. modernesquire
    June 8th, 2010 at 16:32 | #9

    Spending mandates are not taxes. Nor is taking federal money. And only you say Ohio can “never pay back a loan.”

    Ted Strickland didn't raise taxes. Adjusting witholdings is not raising taxes as witholdings do not affect the tax rate. The only way you raise taxes is by raising the rate, not the withholdings. Matt, you can't be this dumb to conflate payroll withholdings with marginal tax rates for the taxable year.

  10. modernesquire
    June 8th, 2010 at 16:39 | #10

    Okay, fine. Taking your view then, you agree with my initial point that Naugle's arugment that Strickland raised taxes is equally invalid because equating raising taxes by keeping them the same level they were the previous tax year would be as really really big faulty assumption there.

    You cannot have it both ways. You cannot claim that Strickland didn't cut taxes when they fell (under his budgets as passed), but then claim he raised them when he kept them the same.

    The fact remains that taxes are objectively lower than there were when they came in office. As the recent budget debate demonstrated, that was not necessarily a predetermined outcome. The Republicans who passed these tax cuts in 2005, after all, left it to Strickland to figure out a way to make these cuts happen while balancing the budget every year.

  11. modernesquire
    June 8th, 2010 at 16:43 | #11

    First the cuts didn't occur in 2005. Legislation that planned on the schedule for future cuts passed in 2005. There is a difference.

    Second, since those legislators left it to Strickland to figure out how to make their tax cuts work by making them happen while balancing the budget, yeah, I think he deserves more credit for them than the legislators who passed something with no plan on how to actually achieve it.

  12. Joshua Culling
    June 10th, 2010 at 15:02 | #12

    Strickland's tax plan was an $844 million tax increase. The Ohio Department of Taxation instructed businesses to withhold income taxes at the expected 2009 rates. In December of that year, Strickland decided that income taxes would be levied at the higher 2008 rates. Thus, a large number of Ohioans were forced to write checks to ODT to compensate. Those who didn't, saw much smaller refund checks.

    Their taxes were raised. Now stop being silly and pick an argument your candidate can win. Kasich mops the floor with him on the tax issue.

  13. Joshua Culling
    June 10th, 2010 at 22:02 | #13

    Strickland’s tax plan was an $844 million tax increase. The Ohio Department of Taxation instructed businesses to withhold income taxes at the expected 2009 rates. In December of that year, Strickland decided that income taxes would be levied at the higher 2008 rates. Thus, a large number of Ohioans were forced to write checks to ODT to compensate. Those who didn’t, saw much smaller refund checks.nnTheir taxes were raised. Now stop being silly and pick an argument your candidate can win. Kasich mops the floor with him on the tax issue.

  14. modernesquire
    June 10th, 2010 at 19:08 | #14

    Changing the tax withholding rate is not the same thing as changing the tax rate. All changing the tax withholding rate does is change the amount of your taxes you prepay the government in an interest-free loan during the tax year. Changing the withholding rate only affects WHEN you pay your taxes, not how much.

    In fact, most Ohioans STILL wound paying LESS in taxes as the standard deduction was increased.

    To say that there was a tax increase simply because a change in the withholding rate forced people to pay more of their taxes at the end of the tax year as opposed to spreading it out better over the year, especially when those taxpayers actually still paid less in income taxes than they did the year before is simply a lie born out of either ignorance or blind ideology or both.

  15. Anonymous
    June 11th, 2010 at 02:08 | #15

    Changing the tax withholding rate is not the same thing as changing the tax rate. All changing the tax withholding rate does is change the amount of your taxes you prepay the government in an interest-free loan during the tax year. Changing the withholding rate only affects WHEN you pay your taxes, not how much.rnrnIn fact, most Ohioans STILL wound paying LESS in taxes as the standard deduction was increased.rnrnTo say that there was a tax increase simply because a change in the withholding rate forced people to pay more of their taxes at the end of the tax year as opposed to spreading it out better over the year, especially when those taxpayers actually still paid less in income taxes than they did the year before is simply a lie born out of either ignorance or blind ideology or both.

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